Dishonesty online dating

However, research suggests that while slight misrepresentations on online dating sites are quite common, major lies are actually rare.Online daters realize that while, on the one hand, they want to make the best possible impression in their profile, on the other hand, if they do want to pursue an offline relationship, they can’t begin it with outright falsehoods that will quickly be revealed for what they are (Toma et al., 2008).So the lies we tell online have the potential to be far more all-encompassing than anything we could get away with in person.Despite that, most online lies, like most offline lies, are subtle, representing people’s attempts to portray themselves in the best possible light, with slight exaggerations (Zimbler & Feldman, 2011).One survey of over 5,000 users of online dating sites asked them to rate, on a 10-point scale, how likely they were to misrepresent themselves in areas such as appearance and job information (Hall et al., 2010).The average rating on these items was about 2, indicating a relatively low level of deception overall. They're especially likely to be dishonest in how they describe their physical appearance.

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When we might be especially honest Surprisingly, people can sometimes be more authentic online than offline in the way they express their personality.

Online communication has become an integral part of most of our lives, and yet many people continue to view those they meet on the Internet with suspicion.

They imagine that online forums are filled with sexual predators and people using false identities. Online interactions vary in terms of two major questions: (1) What venues are we using to communicate, and, (2) What are we lying about?

A survey of 84 online daters found that almost 60 percent misrepresented their weight and 48 percent their height, often using photos that helped obscure the truth (Toma et al., 2008).

It is also somewhat common for online daters to stretch the truth about their age, with about 19 percent lying about it (Toma et al., 2008).

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